iYogi Scam Alerts: Nigerian 419 Internet Fraud Con Smart Individuals

Nigerian 419 Internet fraud is a scam where a Web user is asked to join their name to a bad financial transaction. The scamster normally arrives in an emailed communication that asks for help during an emergency. Consumers are asked to deposit money into their own bank accounts or to, otherwise, become involved in bad financial transactions.

When consumers deposit money into their own bank accounts, this money is available to use instantly; however, the funds are often not registered as the property of the account holder until the deposit is completely processed. When the transaction fails, the consumer must repay this money to the bank. The conman benefits when they receive funds from the consumer in exchange for the deposit that was placed into the bank. Read More…

Here”s what a typical message looks like:

Sample email 1

Return-Path: *****@excite.com
Received: from computer01 ([195.166.233.194])
by pigst*****o.com (8.12.1/8.12.1/Debian -2) with SMTP id

fBANDlse020977

for …; Mon, 10 Dec 2001 18:13:56 -0500

Message-Id: 200112102313.fBAN*****@bacon.hamjudo.com
From: “Jacob Ordi” *****@excite.com

To: …

Subject: very urgent assistance

Mime-Version: 1.0

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”iso-8859-1″

Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2001 00:11:06

Jacob Ordi.

16 Kingsway Road Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria

E-ma*****@excite.com

ja-*****7@excite.com

10th, December , 2001.

Sir,

Request for Urgent Business Relationship.

First I must solicit your confidence in this transaction. This is by virtue of its nature as being utterly confidential and top secret. We shall be counting on your ability and reliability to prosecute a transaction of great magnitude involving a pending business transaction requiring maximum confidence. We are top officials of the Federal Government Contract Review Panel who are interested in importation of goods into our country with funds which are presently trapped in Nigeria. In order to commence this business we solicit your assistance to enable us RECIEVE the said trapped funds ABROAD.

The source of this fund is as follows: During the regime of our late head of state, Gen. Sani Abacha, the government officials set up companies and awarded themselves contracts which were grossly over-invoiced in various Ministries. The NEW CIVILIAN Government set up a Contract Review Panel (C.R.P) and we have identified a lot of inflated contract funds which are presently floating in the Central Bank of Nigeria (C.B.N). However, due to our position as civil servants and members of this panel, we cannot acquire this money in our names. I have therefore, been delegated as a matter of trust by my colleagues of the panel to look for an Overseas partner INTO whose ACCOUNT the sum of US$31,000,000.00 (Thirty one Million United States Dollars) WILL BE PAID BY TELEGRAPHIC TRANSFER.
Hence we are writing you this letter.

We have agreed to share the money thus:

70% for us (the officials) 20% for the FOREIGN PARTNER (you) 10% to be used in settling taxation and all local and foreign expenses. It is from this 70% that we wish to commence the importation business.

Please note that this transaction is 100% safe and we hope that the funds arrive your account in latest ten (10) banking days from the date of reciept of the following information by email: A suitable name and bankaccount into which the funds can be paid.

The above information will enable us write letters of claim and job description respectively. This way we will use your company”s name to apply for payments and re-award the contract in your company name. We are looking forward to doing business with you and solicit your confidentiality in this transaction. For security reasons, please respond only to the above email addresses or fax number 234 *****. Response via telephone and or fax is preferable. I will bring you into the complete picture of this pending project when I have heard from you.

Yours Faithfully,
Jacob Ordi.

Tel/fax: 234 *****

Sample email 2

From:

“Prof.Abiola Williams”<wa1956@gmail.com> | Add to Address book |This is not spam

To: You

Subject: CAN YOU HANDLE IT????

Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 21:15:18 IST

ATTN”

I AM MR. ABIOLA WILLIAMS, THE PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO THE WIFE OF THE FORMER PRESIDENT OF NIGERIA, MUSA YAR”DUA WHO DIED LAST YEAR AFTER SOME MONTHS OF ILLNESS. WHILE THE FORMER PRESIDENT WAS SERIOUSLY ILL, HE WAS TAKEN TO SAUDI ARABIA WHERE HIS EXACT HEALTH CONDITION WAS BROKEN TO THE FAMILY THAT HE WILL NOT MAKE IT AGAIN. ON THAT NOTE, HE WAS BROUGHT BACK TO NIGERIA TO SPEND THE REMAINING DAYS OF HIS LIFE BEFORE HIS DEATH. THE WIFE AS THE FIRST LADY THEN, USED HER HUSBAND POSITION TO REMOVE A LOT OF MONEY FROM THE PRESIDENTIAL VAULT.

AFTER HIS DEATH AND BURIAL, THE WIFE CONTACTED ME THAT SHE HAS A TOTAL SUM OF $20M CASH WHICH SHE DEPOSITED WITH A SECURITY COMPANY AND THAT I SHOULD HELP HER SOLICIT FOR A RELIABLE AND TRUSTED PERSON WHO CAN HELP THE FAMILY TO KEEP THE CASH PENDING HER ARRIVAL FOR SHARING AND INVESTING. SHE SAID THAT SHE DOES NOT WANT TO ENTRUST THIS FUND INTO THE HANDS OF SOMEBODY THAT IS KNOWN TO THE FAMILY SO AS TO AVOID GREED AND ELUDE TRACE OF ANY KIND.

PLEASE I WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT THIS TRANSACTION IS RISK FREE. YOU HAVE NO REASON TO ENTERTAIN ANY FEAR. I AM STILL WORKING IN THE PRESIDENCY AND I WILL PROTECT YOU AT ALL LEVELS. IF YOU AN ACCEPT TO KEEP THIS FUND UNDER YOUR CUSTODY, I WILL CONCLUDE WITH THE DIPLOMATIC COURIER COMPANY FOR THE DELIVERY OF THE CONSIGNMENT TO YOU AS A DIPLOMATIC LUGGAGE. UNDER THIS ARRANGEMENT,THE LUGGAGE WILL NOT BE INSPECTED HENCE IT WILL HAVE A DIPLOMATIC TAG WHICH WILL PROTECT IT FROM INSPECTION BY ANY AUTHORITY UNTIL IT GETS TO YOU. THE DIPLOMAT WHO WILL DELIVER THE CASH TO YOU DOES NOT AND WILL NOT KNOW THE CONTENT OF THE CONSIGNMENT.SEND ME YOUR PHYSICAL ADDRESS, DIRECT TELEPHONE NUMBERS WHICH THE DIPLOMAT WILL USE TO REACH YOU ON HIS ARRIVAL IN YOUR COUNTRY.

MEANWHILE PLEASE TAKE NOTE AT THE END OF THE TRANSACTION,YOU WILL BE ENTITLE TO 30% OF THE TOTAL SUM, WHILE 10% WILL BE SET ASIDE FOR ALL TRANSACTION EXPENDITURES AND THE REMANING 60% IS THE FIRST LADY AND HER CHILDREN AND MY HUMBLE SELF.

ONCE YOU RECEIVE THIS EMAIL, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CALL ME ON THIS

CONFIDENTIAL TELEPHONE NUMBER +23481****5229 or 0112****536****9 AND ASK ANY QUESTION YOU MAY WISH TO ASK FOR CLARIFICATIONS OR YOU CAN READ THE STORY LINE ON BBC NEWS JUST CLICK THIS LINK Http://News.bbc.co.uk/2/Hi/Africa/6187249.stm OR COPY AND PASTE TO YOUR ADDRESS BAR AND CLICK TO READ

REGARDS,

ABIOLA WILLIAMS

Ever received a mail from a Nigerian official or diplomat which claimed to make you richer by a million bucks or more? Have you been a victim of the notorious Nigerian or 419 fraud and ended up in a complete fiasco? Share your story with us at iYogi and we will publish your story to ensure that innocent people do not get defrauded anymore by the Nigerian fraud.

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Raisa Linares

7 Feb, 2013

I wish I could have come across this iYogi Scam alert post on Nigerian / 419 Scam earlier! As I was going through different forms of advance fee fraud, I read Purchase of Real Estate scam, it reminded of how I was once victimized by Nigerian 419 Scam. My mistake was that I was carried away by the property purchase deal. Keep updating with more examples of Nigerian 419 Scam before we lose our money and get cheated.

Kirby Kiara

20 Feb, 2013

There’s no end to scams and frauds. You get over one and there’s another one to con you. What is most important is to keep yourself abreast with all the latest scam information to protect yourself from being a victim. I find iyogi scam alerts a good medium to know about all the latest scam alerts… keep up the good work guys!

Darkocean Adam

30 Jan, 2013

Guys beware of these nasty scams. I have been duped of $2000 due to a scam that was running on FB. I believed in an offer that came to me as a link and sent out the money to buy the holiday deal, only to realize that it was scam and I’ve lost my hard-earned money. I have spoken to the officers about the fraudulent activity, but still waiting for the issue to get resolved.

Samantha Jayson

17 Jan, 2013

iYogi scam alerts have saved me from becoming a soft target to scammers. I got a link on my FB account that came through a friend. But since I was not sure as to what this link contains, I avoided clicking on it. I had read about fake and malicious links on one of iyogi’s post. Few days after, I heard some of my friends complaining about the virus infection that the link was carrying. Thank God I was saved.

Kenneth Floyd

10 Jan, 2013

The best way to protect yourself from internet frauds and scams is to use your brain wisely. Always cross check offers that look too good to be true. It’s really foolish to trust every offer that comes your way. I always apply my brain and double check any deal or discount to confirm its authenticity…

Robert Costa

3 Jan, 2013

I’m an avid reader of iYogi scam alerts. Your articles give my unconscious mind a good shock and help me stay aware of all the latest frauds prevailing on the internet… i want you to keep posting more and more scam articles on regular basis.

Todd Riley, Kansas City

28 Dec, 2012

Hey thanks a ton for citing examples of Nigerian 419 Internet frauds. These sample e-mails will be of great help to identify crafty mails from online scammers. Though I am usually a bit indifferent toward e-mails from unknown strangers, but, I have seen many instances of these mails in my inbox. Thanks iYogi for updating with online scams.

Patrick Gordon

21 Dec, 2012

Hello Michele, It’s very saddening to know that people are duping others in the name of charity. Instead of helping the affected people they are luring them in the name of helping them. There cannot be a crime bigger than this. People like this should be caught and punished severely. I am really shocked on reading about this method employed by them. Thanks iyogi for bringing this to the notice of common people like me.

Matt Striker

13 Dec, 2012

I am very pleased to know that iyogi is spreading awareness among common people about the various types of scams that are making rounds around the web world. I being a software engineer was not even aware of some of the scams that iYogi alerts have discussed here. But now i know which site to visit to keep myself updated with the latest scams.

Lauriel Faulkner

7 Dec, 2012

These days hundreds and thousands of scams are prevailing. This Nigeria scam has trapped many innocent individuals. Even I was about to become a victim of this scam. Thanks to my conscious and iyogi scam alerts.

Michele Janssen

27 Nov, 2012

I have always brushed aside these e-mails that look too promising to be true. Why would anyone give me his inheritance or why have only I won lottery tickets worth thousands of dollars? All these offers look to lucrative to be true. I seriously don’t understand how people fall for these offers… I think iyogi is doing a great job by educating people who fall for these scams…

Allen Almachar

15 Nov, 2012

Oh my gosh! There’s scam for everything in America. US is slowly becoming land of scammers and fraudsters. The most recent one is the charity scam for people devastated in Sandy. People who run scam on the name of charity should be severely punished. They are not just scamming people who want to donate money, but also cheating those who want to rebuild their lives… Let’s donate money only through Red Cross centers or Salvation Army who genuinely help people affected by this storm.

Rober† Scott

08 Nov, 2012

@ellie, just read through the emails carefully. If they are from scammers, you’ll notice lots of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. Moreover, the offers will be too luring to be true… it’s easy to know what’s right and what’s wrong. But at times we just like going with the flow…

Ellie Jackson

09 Sep, 2012

I am a business person and I receive several mails proposing partnership of such kind. It becomes so difficult for me to filter the genuine ones amongst all these scam mails. All thanks to iYogi Scam alert, Now I know the mails from unknown sources are not to be trusted and are scams. Be alert , always!!

Clarke, Fairbanks

09 Sep, 2012

iYogi alerts you to all sorts of scams under the sun, and has penetrating articles on the Nigerian 419 scam, perhaps the most notorious scam of them all. I knew about this scam and am glad to say though I got many mails asking for help in transferring money to foreign locations, I never fell for it.

Thomas Malagodi

05 Sep, 2012

I had some idea about this Nigerian scam but never experienced it until one of my friend received such mail from an unknown source. That was something which brought me here at iYogi scam alerts where I read about the exact thing. I believe ,my little knowledge turned useful in this case for my friend and thus, he was prevented from being a prey for such kind of scam. Thanks iYogi Scam alerts

Travis, Newark

1 Sep, 2012

I have a business and get a large number of e-mails. One day I received a mail asking my help to transfer a huge amount of money from an unnamed African country to a safe haven. It was good that I”d read iYogi scam alerts and I ignored the mail completely.

Peter George, Miami

30 Aug, 2012

My brother thought he”d won the lottery when he received a mail saying he”d won ten million pounds in the annual British lucky draw. Of course he was asked to wire all his personal details; it was only when he was asked for his bank account numbers he smelt a scam. Thank God he”d read iYogi scam alerts and knew this was just another clever scam!

Tom Collins, New York City

26 Aug, 2012

One day I received an e-mail from an unknown sender asking my help to transfer a large amount of money from the collapsing regime of an unnamed African country. The amount was monstrous and my suspicions were aroused instantly. It was only after I read iYogi scam alerts I realized I was dealing with a Nigerian scam.

Charles, Seattle

22 Aug, 2012

I had heard about the infamous Nigerian scam. One day I received a mail that offered me up to ten million dollars by the fleeing scion of a wealthy Nigerian family. Of course they needed help in transferring the money to a ”safe” location. I instantly smelt a scam and it was only after I read iYogi scam alerts that I realized how deadly this can be. I am glad I did not respond to the offer or God knows how much money I”d have lost!

Melissa M, Reno

18 Aug, 2012

I got a mail offering me a huge amount of money by some Nigerian official. I was suspicious and it was only after I read iYogi scam alerts that I realized what a scam this is. I am glad I did not respond to the offer or I”d have lost a great deal of money in the bargain.

Orlando Sam, Naples

11 Jul, 2012

Hi Cory, it sound”s great that you didn”t fall into the Nigerian scam. I”ve a suggestion; don”t fall for them if you are approached in the future. Also, if you have been victimized by similar crimes or someone attempts to victimize you in the future, remember that reporting internet scams is the most affective way to stop them and help other people not become victims of the same crimes.

Nigerian or 419 Internet Fraud

Cory DuBose, Houston Texas

25 Feb, 2012

My experience with the 419 Internet fraud is not at all unique, as I am, like a lot of people, who have received these emails. Though I would now easily brush aside these emails, this was not always the case. There was a time when I hadn”t seen a Nigerian fraud email before, and I was intrigued by the content.

I know that nothing comes for free, and the possibility of a person swooping down and offering free access to $10 million is just not likely. But the first time I saw the email, I was taken aback. Could this be real? How in the world is this possible? Am I just the luckiest guy in the world? With no knowledge of these scams up to that point, I had no frame of reference to work with. At the time, I was tempted to respond to the email from a certain Nigerian prince.

Luckily for me, I was smart enough to do a bit of background research. Though at the time there was not a ton of information out there about the 419 scam, there were plenty of websites mentioning Nigerian fraud as a possibility. All I needed was one little sentence indicating that it might be a fraud, and this was enough to give me off of the email. I never responded, but it made me think how easy it would be to scam a person who might be desperate. Someone who didn”t think it through like I did might have fallen for the bait.